Why are Working Women Starting to Unplug from Their Churches?

Woman prayingBy on December 5, 2014 originally posted at the Institute for Faith, Work and Economics

When we look in the pews on Sunday morning, what kinds of women do we see?

Wives with their husbands? Mothers with their children? The single women sitting alone in the back rows?

Yes, they are all of those things and so much more. How do we use these women to grow and serve the church?

Camouflaged in Church

In America, 47% of the workforce is made up of women, and the percentage has doubled in every age category since 1950, according to the U.S. Congress Joint Economic Committee. The Committee also reports that 83% of women raising children work outside of the home, compared to 47% in 1975. AND a whopping 75% of them work full-time!

These women are out there. In fact, We may not realize that half of the women in the church are working women, because they are camouflaged.

We’re not talking about green outfits. No, her camouflage looks different. Her camouflage is her Sunday-best, children calling her “Mommy,” and maybe a strong, spiritual husband beside her. She blends with others because there is no other group for her.

And what about the single women who don’t get married until later in life? They don’t fit into the different affinity groups:  “moms”, “married”, “divorced.” And the “singles” are often college-aged/recent graduates that don’t relate to them either.

Many of these women haven chosen to not marry yet and are in the workplace, but they often quietly slip in and out of church to avoid the sympathy, advice, and blind dates that are thrown their way. Sadly, they may end up seeing themselves as “not-mothers” and “not-wives” instead of someone who is pursuing her Ephesians 2:10 calling in the workplace.

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The Trouble With Bright Girls

For women, ability doesn’t always lead to confidence. Here’s why.

Published on January 27, 2011 by Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D. in The Science of Success

11679644-smart-schoolgirl-looking-above-her-glasses-in-front-of-a-blackboardSuccessful women know only too well that in any male-dominated profession, we often find ourselves at a distinct disadvantage. We are routinely underestimated, underutilized, and even underpaid. Studies show that women need to perform at extraordinarily high levels, just to appear moderately competent compared to our male coworkers.

But in my experience, smart and talented women rarely realize that one of the toughest hurdles they’ll have to overcome to be successful lies within. We judge our own abilities not only more harshly, but fundamentally differently, than men do. Understanding why we do it is the first step to righting a terrible wrong. And to do that, we need to take a step back in time.

Chances are good that if you are a successful professional today, you were a pretty bright fifth grade girl. My graduate advisor, psychologist Carol Dweck (author of Mindset) conducted a series of studies in the 1980s, looking at how bright girls and boys in the fifth grade handled new, difficult and confusing material.

She found that bright girls, when given something to learn that was particularly foreign or complex, were quick to give up–and the higher the girls’ IQ, the more likely they were to throw in the towel. In fact, the straight-A girls showed the most helpless responses. Bright boys, on the other hand, saw the difficult material as a challenge, and found it energizing. They were more likely to redouble their efforts, rather than give up.

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Salem, OR Chapter of The Well Armed Woman

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The Well Armed Woman is local groups of women around the country that meet monthly to practice, learn and grow as shooters. We create opportunities for women shooters to be introduced to issues that are important to us, learn safe gun handling skills and train together.

We are here to expand the world of firearms to women all over the country in a safe, non-threatening way with the purpose of Educating, Equipping and Empowering woman shooters.

  • Educating women on firearm safety, gun care and handling
  • Developing gun handling skills
  • Building defensive gun skills and awareness
  • Developing confidence
  • Networking with women of like interests
  • Meeting new people/socializing 531714_3494237154790_1764379880_n

This is a brand new program and Salem, Oregon is part of a growing list of chapters forming all over the country.

We welcome women 21 years and older of all experience levels. From seasoned shooters to women just getting started with buying, shooting, and caring for firearms, we offer a comfortable learning environment.

If you live in the Mid-Willamette Valley and want to find out more send an email to dqnTWAW@gmail.com or click here to find out more.