Robert Oscar Lopez: I was raised by lesbians, and I oppose gay marriage

by Robert Oscar Lopez | Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:17 EST | LifeSiteNews

August 14, 2012 (thePublicDiscourse.com) – Between 1973 and 1990, when my beloved mother passed away, she and her female romantic partner raised me. They had separate houses but spent nearly all their weekends together, with me, in a trailer tucked discreetly in an RV park 50 minutes away from the town where we lived. As the youngest of my mother’s biological children, I was the only child who experienced childhood without my father being around.

After my mother’s partner’s children had left for college, she moved into our house in town. I lived with both of them for the brief time before my mother died at the age of 53. I was 19. In other words, I was the only child who experienced life under “gay parenting” as that term is understood today.

Quite simply, growing up with gay parents was very difficult, and not because of prejudice from neighbors. People in our community didn’t really know what was going on in the house. To most outside observers, I was a well-raised, high-achieving child, finishing high school with straight A’s.

Inside, however, I was confused. When your home life is so drastically different from everyone around you, in a fundamental way striking at basic physical relations, you grow up weird. I have no mental health disorders or biological conditions. I just grew up in a house so unusual that I was destined to exist as a social outcast.

My peers learned all the unwritten rules of decorum and body language in their homes; they understood what was appropriate to say in certain settings and what wasn’t; they learned both traditionally masculine and traditionally feminine social mechanisms.

Even if my peers’ parents were divorced, and many of them were, they still grew up seeing male and female social models. They learned, typically, how to be bold and unflinching from male figures and how to write thank-you cards and be sensitive from female figures. These are stereotypes, of course, but stereotypes come in handy when you inevitably leave the safety of your lesbian mom’s trailer and have to work and survive in a world where everybody thinks in stereotypical terms, even gays.

I had no male figure at all to follow, and my mother and her partner were both unlike traditional fathers or traditional mothers. As a result, I had very few recognizable social cues to offer potential male or female friends, since I was neither confident nor sensitive to others. Thus I befriended people rarely and alienated others easily. Gay people who grew up in straight parents’ households may have struggled with their sexual orientation; but when it came to the vast social universe of adaptations not dealing with sexuality—how to act, how to speak, how to behave—they had the advantage of learning at home. Many gays don’t realize what a blessing it was to be reared in a traditional home.

Continue reading…

H/T Teresa Harke from the Oregon Family Council

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5 thoughts on “Robert Oscar Lopez: I was raised by lesbians, and I oppose gay marriage

  1. Thank you for that. It is the perfect argument for gay marriage: he tells how difficult it is to be “strange”. To make it easier to be diverse, we support equality- including in marriage.

    • Thanks for your comment Clare, but I think you missed the point of the article and are more interested in pushing an agenda rather than addressing the very real issues the author speaks about.

      • The article is quite long, and it would be tedious to go over all of it, but I understood the thing, I assure you, and have reached the crux of the matter. What agenda are you pushing?

  2. This is one man’s truth with regard to gay marriage. I support traditional marriage and think Robert’s story speaks to certain truths about male and female roles in the raising of children. That does certainly qualify as an agenda so, guilty as charged.

    • There’s striking, isn’t it now? “Agenda” whispers the conservative, and the liberal reacts with anger and hurt. I must learn to be less set off by that word. 🙂

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